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Equine Therapy

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Equine Therapy

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That pets have a healing power is well established. Some pets have had an inherent connection with the human soul since ancient times, established through mutual trust and inter-dependence that has lasted through times Immemorial. Horses fall in that category. Every civilization celebrates man’s relationship with horses, at war, at times of peace and survival. Whether the taming of the wild west, the heroics of Alexander The Great, or the conquests of Ghenghis Khan, horses were an integral part of the trust and human survival in the most testing times..

Immortal stories such as Black Beauty, Misty, The Black Stallion, The Horse And His Boy, War Horse, King of The Wind, My Friend Flicka, and even The Helen of Troy, firmly establish a relationship of undying love and friendship between horses and their owners Even in the world, we live in today, working with horses helps establish that ancient bond of love and friendship that has existed since ancient times. Therapeutic horse riding, feeding, washing, and grooming, or even stable management is the proverbial ‘Chicken Soup for the soul’. Engaging with horses has been used as a therapeutic science by ancient greeks.

Some of the therapies engaged with horses and adults are:
  • Horses are keen observers sensitive to movement and emotion. They often mirror a client’s emotions, conveying understanding and connection that allows the client to feel safe.
  • PTSD or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is often treated through equine therapy. It has been observed that patients might not be keen to bond or engage with humans, but have been able to fall in love with a horse, thus allowing for a progressive recovery.
  • Equine Therapy is actively used to treat AHDH or Attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder. Dr. Kay Trotter, a licensed professional counselor, author, and founder of Equine Partners in Counseling (EPIC) Enterprises, was one of the first to dedicate research to the effectiveness of equine-assisted psychotherapy. Trotter found that introducing horses to the therapeutic process showed significantly increased positive behaviors while reducing negative behaviors.